Talk: Karima Khalil at the Nour Festival of Arts

Credit: Hossam el Hamalawy

Tonight, Leighton House is hosting a conversation with Karima Khalil, the photographer who has recently edited a book of photographs from the Egyptian protests, Messages from Tahrir.

The event is part of Leighton’s two month-long Nour Festival of Arts, which comes to an end next Wednesday, 30 November.

As well as presenting her photographs, Khalil will be giving her account of the Tahrir Square uprising in January and February of this year, talking to the travel writer Anthony Sattin.

Messages from Tahrir compiles photographs by Kahlil and 35 other photographers (such as Hossam el Hamalawy, above) of protesters’ messages, from banners and signs to notes taped to mouths and painted on hands.

In a guest blog for The Spectator, Khalil wrote:

“I saw messages written on people’s foreheads, others spelled out on the ground with rocks, cups, candles and even date pits. Largely homemade, these handwritten messages expressed yearnings that we Egyptians had been prevented from voicing for decades: messages in Arabic addressing Mubarak and his hated regime directly, but also in English, aimed at the world: ‘Here we are and this is what we want’. The signs, with their eloquence and passion, articulated a unique moment in our history that I felt had to be preserved; they were simply too heartfelt to be lost.”

The conversation begins at 7pm, and tickets cost £6/£8 (www.nourfestival.co.uk/020 7471 9153).

Leighton House is on our Middle Eastern Cultural Spaces in London map; click here to see more.

Laurie Tuffrey

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